Reception/Reviews

How films and other programming in theaters were received by audiences

Film Censorship: America's Disagreement

The early 1900's era of filmmaking was under the firm grasp of the National Board of Censorship, an organization formed to prevent the showings of indecent or suggestive content in movies. This became quite a hot topic among viewers at the time. Some Americans preferred a restriction on what they considered to be inappropriate while others favored a more risqué style. This debate did not go unnoticed in Portland, Oregon and in fact seemed to emphasize the same national issues. Listed below are four separate segments from two Portland Newspapers between years of 1910 and 1922.

"Hypocrites"- Censor Boards and when Nudity is Acceptable

While doing research on The Grand Theater in Bandon Oregon, I came across an advertisement for a film titled "Hypocrites". In the advertisement, it described how the film had been banned in Portland and across the country and that the film will easily offend those who are prudish.

Heppner, Oregon

Heppner, Oregon is home to its very own Star Theatre, which was known as being one of the only theatres to show moving pictures in Heppner Oregon during the early 1900's as well as being a popular public space for other forms of performance art. Heppner's Star Theatre was owned and operated by B.G. Sigsbee and the program usually showed local short films and/or feature length films. The films showed at the theatre ranged in genres, including comedies, drama, war, etc.